Wednesday, April 20, 2011

The Five Student Colors Of L. S. Lowry



"They have a naivete and an approach," he said, "that the professional, or the amateur that becomes professional, loses after a time. I find far more pleasure in an amateur's work, or a local art society, than I do in a proper show. With the amateur you don't know what you're going to see ... but in the art trade you've a pretty good idea."



L. S. Lowry
on enjoying amateur art
quoted in
The proud provincial loneliness of LS Lowry



(That painting is Lowry’s
“Man Looking At Something.”)



"I am a simple man and I use simple materials: Ivory Black, Vermilion, Prussian Blue, Yellow Ochre, Flake White and no medium. That’s all I’ve ever used in my paintings."


L. S. Lowry
quoted at Winsor and Newton
in
The Colour Palette of L.S Lowry






A British company called Winsor and Newton
makes paints. They’ve made paints for almost two hundred years.
Their line of artist-quality oil paints contains
more than a hundred colors and many artists
consider it the best oil paint in production.

The Winsor and Newton website includes features
on famous artists who liked Winsor and Newton.

This British company whose artist-quality
line of carefully crafted, world-class fine oil paints
contains over a hundred colors doesn’t mind
pointing out L. S. Lowry used just five colors
and picked those five colors from Winsor and Newton’s
inexpensive line of student-quality paints.

Sometimes the Brits are so cool they seem almost . . . French.







. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .



L. S. Lowry at Wikipedia



Winsor and Newton website



This is Lowry’s painting, “Portrait of Ann.”
It may or may not be a portrait of a person named ‘Ann.’







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Fripp began playing guitar at the age
of eleven. He says he was tone deaf
with no sense of rhythm when he started.
His comment on dealing with the obstacle
is “Music so wishes to be heard
that it sometimes calls on
unlikely characters to give it voice.


from Robert Fripp at Wikipedia





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Jeanne H├ębuterne — Art As A Grail

























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